Facebook
Name
Email
Phone
Message

Recovering Data from a Scratched CD

Recovering Data from a Scratched CD

Have you ever put your favorite CD, music CD, or data backup CD into your CD/DVD reader only to find the disk won’t read? This is common with CD storage disk. The disk becomes scratched over long periods of usage or mistreatment. When you insert your CD into your CD/DVD player a laser beam scans the surface of the disk and reads the data. When the disk becomes scratched the laser beam can no longer read the metal layer under the protective plastic layer to display the disk contents.

The surface of the CD is plastic to protect the data stored on the disk. The plastic surface becomes scratched resulting in a non-readable disk. By repairing the scratches on the plastic surface, the laser beam can reach the protective metal layer and read the information stored. Using common household products to repair and smooth the protective layer, allows the laser to read the disk. Here are simple tricks to repair the scratches on your CD.

4 Household Products To Clean And Repair Scratches On CD Disc

1. Use toothpaste to repair scratches

Use a non-gel based toothpaste such a Colgate to smooth the scratches on the surface of your CD. Apply a small amount of toothpaste to the plastic surface of the disk. Use a cotton swab or cotton ball to gently rub the toothpaste over the surface of the disk. The toothpaste polishes the disk surface and will smooth the scratches on the disk. Rinse the disk in cold water and dry with a non-abrasive cotton cloth. A paper towel works great when drying your disk.

2. Use a metal polish cleaner to repair the scratches

Brasso works wonders when repairing scratches on your CD’s surface. Apply a small amount of Brasso to the disk surface. Rub the disk surface with a cotton swab or cotton ball. After, apply Vaseline to the disk surface and continue to rub with a cotton ball. Rinse the disk in warm water and dry with a non-abrasive cotton cloth or paper towel.

3. Use baking soda to remove scratches from the CD

Mix a small amount of baking soda with water to form a paste. Use a non-abrasive cotton cloth to apply the baking soda paste to the disk surface. Gently rub the baking soda buffing out the scratches on the plastic surface. Rinse in warm water and dry with non-abrasive cotton cloth or paper towel.

4. Use oil to repair the scratches on your CD

Apply a small amount of oil to the CD and gently polish the disk surface using a non-abrasive cotton cloth. After buffing the CD surface with oil, rinse in warm water. Gently dry the CD with a non-abrasive cotton cloth or paper towel.

Once your CD’s repaired and you can read the disk, backup the contents, to your hard drive. You may use the disk again after repairing the scratches on the surface. To be safe, always copy the contents of your CD to your hard drive or flash drive.

Recommended Posts | Data Loss Prevention

Protecting Your Data Storage Platforms from Hackers
1263

Protecting Your Data Storage Platforms from Hackers

The days are now long gone, when you could save data without worrying about it being hacked or stolen. We are hearing about threats to data, by malicious forces. Use of some techniques, you can be sure that hackers will have a really hard time trying to steal anything from any of storage platforms ...
Been Hacked
1761

Have you Been Hacked? Now What?

If your ISP provider notified you that your computer has become part of a zombie botnet, take them seriously. Your computer has been hacked and it is critical that you take evasive actions to protect your data. A virus or other malware that is installed on your computer can now be used to attack ...
Invest in Data Loss Prevention
1090

Care To Invest In Data Loss Prevention

Organizations underestimate the need for the involvement of non-IT units. Prevention against data loss (DLP or "Data Loss Prevention"), normally provided by the manufacturers together with network appliances, continues to be a very expensive technology, which compels organizations to spend big money ...
Keeping Your Data Cool and Safe
2078

Keeping Your Data Cool and Safe

Hard drives store your data and run your computers today. Hard drive's today is a better storage medium, but by no means, perfect. Failure of hard drives is common in all computers, with no real way of preventing it. Hard drives fail for several reasons, and the most common is overheating ...